Snapshot

Terms and Dates:

  • Fall 2019
  • Spring 2020

Advisor:

Kristen Grace

Housing Options:

Hostel/Hotel/Guest House

Cornell Affiliations:

Global Learning

Off-campus partner:

SFS - The School for Field Studies

Overview

Opportunity Description

Learn about the environmental, socioeconomic, and policy drivers for wildlife conservation and rural development and the implications of land reform and demographic change.

Program Highlights

  • During game drives and field activities, observe elephants, lions, giraffes, cheetahs, jaguars, hyenas, rhinoceroses, and even African wild dogs, one of the most endangered mammals in the world
  • Practice a variety of exercises in wildlife conservation and management: observing predator-prey interactions; surveying bird and ungulate populations; evaluating species’ habitat preferences and use; and assessing tourists’ wildlife viewing patterns
  • Multi-day field expedition and camping trip to Serengeti National Park, studying large mammal ecology, wildlife migrations, and tourist behavior in the park
  • Multi-day trip to Tarangire National Park and surrounding areas for field exercises on wildlife population counting, lion ecology and behavior, conservation models, and human-wildlife conflicts
  • Visit cultural manyatta (settlements), an opportunity to get a window into Maasai and Iraqw cultures: traditional ceremonies, demonstrations of fire-making, and dances by Maasai morans (warriors)

Why Study Wildlife Management in Tanzania?

Northern Tanzania is a hub of wildlife tourism. Home to world-famous national parks such as Tarangire, Lake Manyara, Kilimanjaro, Serengeti, and the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, this remarkably scenic area is the center of tourism in East Africa. It has also been the home of the Maasai, Iraqw, and other groups for centuries.

The SFS curriculum and research focus on how changes in land use and resource availability in the Tarangire-Manyara ecosystem can be managed to foster the well-being of local communities while safeguarding and promoting biodiversity conservation.

Directed Research

Through Directed Research (DR)—as opposed to basic, applied, or independent research— conduct research on a specific topic that is part of the SFS Center’s long-term strategic research plan, which has been developed in partnership with local community stakeholders and clients.

How do I apply?

Applying to study abroad is a 2-Step process.  You may complete both steps simultaneously, but Cornell Approval must be obtained before your program advisor in Global Learning can complete any approval or nomination forms for the program itself. 

  1. For Cornell Approval, click on the "Apply" button on this webpage. Applications are approved by the Office of Global Learning on a rolling basis until the application deadline listed on this webpage.
  2. For Program Admission, complete an external application directly on the program’s webpage, using the link in the “Snapshot” section. Note that this deadline may be in advance of the general Cornell deadline for approval.  Many programs fill by rolling admission.

Only 1st and 2nd choice programs will be considered for Cornell approval.  Cornell Approval is required for credit from Cornell.

 

Returning Applicants